• @Delphia@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        32 months ago

        We were talking about this movie this week and someone said “You couldnt make that movie now!” but theres no reason to. The only joke I can rhink of thats too dated is Hedley/Heddey

  • Nusm
    link
    fedilink
    English
    82 months ago

    Good mornin’ ma’am, and isn’t it a loooovely mornin’?

  • theodewere
    link
    fedilink
    62 months ago

    Mel Brooks wrote, directed and starred in the #1 AND the #4 pictures at the box office that year… Saddles was #1 and Young Frankenstein was #4…

    • kindenough
      link
      fedilink
      62 months ago

      And he is still alive and will be a 100 years old in 2 years.

      • theodewere
        link
        fedilink
        12 months ago

        same here but the scene that kills me is the train platform where they’re saying goodbye

  • AutoTL;DRB
    link
    fedilink
    English
    12 months ago

    This is the best summary I could come up with:


    Fifty years ago, Mel Brooks released Blazing Saddles to gales of laughter and a mighty roar of flatulence jokes.

    But in 1974, he was significantly less well-known, having made a couple of mildly successful comedies (The Twelve Chairs and The Producers) and worked in Sid Caesar’s joke-writer stable for TV.

    But his co-screenwriter Richard Pryor insisted he use it — and use it often — consciously putting it the mouths of evil or unthinking characters, so that star Cleavon Little could comically mock or demolish them.

    Until, that is, it turns into a spoof of The Blue Angel, as Madeline Kahn’s seductress-for-hire Lili Von Shtupp croons a gloriously off-pitch “I’m Tired” and sets about seducing Sheriff Bart.

    Even Busby Berkeley musicals come in for a brief ribbing when a brawl literally breaks the fourth wall and the cast crashes into a dance number on a nearby soundstage.

    So on Feb. 7, 1974, the studio opened the film as a test in three cities — NYC, LA, Chicago — considered the most likely to get Brooks’ Borscht Belt sense of humor.


    The original article contains 828 words, the summary contains 180 words. Saved 78%. I’m a bot and I’m open source!

  • Deceptichum
    link
    fedilink
    -6
    edit-2
    2 months ago

    As someone who wasn’t alive during its release, it really doesn’t hold up well.

    Probably the most boring comedy I’ve seen in my life. Like the most memorable scenes are fart jokes and saying people are stupid? Maybe this was revolutionary at the time but I’d rather watch the Producers, History of the World, or Space Balls any day.

    • Drusas
      link
      fedilink
      22 months ago

      Black comedy really doesn’t seem popular with the younger generations. It’s a shame, really. But humor/expression styles change over time, so so it goes.

      • Deceptichum
        link
        fedilink
        0
        edit-2
        2 months ago

        Black comedy is fine, Blazing Saddles is just boring at best and juvenile in the lamest way at worst.

        Take Dr Stangelove for an example of a well done black comedy film with amazingly witty dialogue.

    • Cosmic Cleric
      link
      fedilink
      11 month ago

      Maybe this was revolutionary at the time but I’d rather watch the Producers, History of the World, or Space Balls any day.

      It’s interesting how perspectives work.

      I never like the Producers at all, I would describe it basically the same way you describe Blazing Saddles, and I love Blazing Saddles (though I hate regular westerns).

      But then both you and I like History of the World and Spaceballs.

      So, like I said, perspectives are strange.