• @Domiku@beehaw.org
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    293 months ago

    If you’re looking for a free alternative, check out how to use Markdown files. Obsidian is a popular (but not open-source) program. The beautiful of .md is that it’s plain text and can be easily imported into a variety of applications, including a simple text editor like Notepad. Here’s a good overview video.

    • Yes, Obsidian is great. The app itself is proprietary but the files are portable plain text. I feel like that makes it pretty future proof. If it ever shuts down or enshittifies, there will be alternatives.

    • NaN
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      123 months ago

      People need to watch out for Obsidian’s license. If you use it for notes for your job there is a strong possibility you need to pay.

      I’ve been pleased with Marktext for editing and Joplin for storing notes.

      • @aesopjah
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        33 months ago

        what? I have never heard this about them. is that possibly if you use their sync service?

        • NaN
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          3 months ago

          Sync is always paid, and optional. A commercial license and sync are separate.

          They list it pretty clearly, but most people probably don’t read it. This is a bit troublesome since it’s in flathub and very easy to install. Probably routinely violated, that’s the danger of proprietary software. https://obsidian.md/license

          Commercial Use Licenses are required whenever Obsidian is being used for work for a business with two or more personnel. Sole proprietorships or other one-person organizations do not require a Commercial Use License. Work for educational purposes does not require a Commercial Use License.

          Non-profits are also exempted.

        • @Kiloee@discuss.tchncs.de
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          23 months ago

          They say on their website that as soon as you use it for commercial projects, you need to get a paid plan. Their own sync is only availble on a paid plan iirc, so you should be fine.

        • Its always something isnt it?

          I too had issues with some stuff at first. But until I dive into org mode its the best i was getting.

          (Im telling this from stumbling through many apps like tiddlywiki, obsidian, joplin, qownnotes, trilliumnotes, standardnotes, and probably more)

        • @Rockslide0482@discuss.tchncs.de
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          13 months ago

          I primarily use logseq but have obsidian configured to use the same directory. I then use logseq for journaling and some tag notes that have searches and links kind of built in. Then I have obsidian for wiki or KB type notes. I can then link to parts of that in logseq. I also use obsidian for a few niche situations where the plugins add value. Its not a perfect solution but it works pretty well for me. I also typically use obsidian to folder directory organize my non journal notes, bit really you could just as easily use your file browser for that.

      • Kajko
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        33 months ago

        Logseq has worked best for me and my ADHD so far.

      • @Awe@lemmy.ml
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        23 months ago

        Last I checked, Joplin does not use a folder structure that is easy to port over. Their files are all id’s instead of usable file names, so without Joplin, you won’t be finding anything.

        They are still plaintext .MD files though.

        • @redacted_name@lemmy.ca
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          3 months ago

          Joplin requires you to migrate each notebook individually so it’s fiddly if you have lots of notebooks in lots of folders.

          But one you’ve done it you’re free!

          Well worth the effort. I downgraded to free Evernote after the last price hike and stopped using it… Now I can delete the app entirely.

    • @tal@lemmy.today
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      3 months ago

      I don’t use Evernote, so I don’t have a great feel for its capabilities, but my impression from the skims I’ve done in the past is that if someone is using Evernote, their workflow may not adapt directly to Markdown.

      It has the ability to have paper documents (handwritten things, business cards, etc) scanned in and the system is aware of it, can use the business cards as contacts.

      It’s got to-do lists. Markdown doesn’t really have a concept of that. Org-mode does, but that’s not really a standardized format like Markdown is.

      It has calendar integration.

      It has embedded images. From samples, Evernote seems to bill this as people using this for things like hand sketches. There are ways to embed images in some variants of Markdown, but Markdown (and associated software) isn’t really primarily aimed at mixed-media documents, and I would guess that part of the selling point of Evernote is that there’s a low bar to adding them.

      It supports embedding things like Excel documents.

      All that being said, I like Markdown, and for my own notes, I tend to use org-mode for things that aren’t gonna be distributed, and Markdown for things that are. But while I use them – and for my use cases, they do some things better, like having tables that recompute values in org-mode, and I can easily use source control on them – I don’t think that they’d be a great drop-in replacement for many people who use Evernote. They’d have to use a different workflow.

      Markdown is great if you spend a lot of time typing text on a computer. But if you spend time jotting notes by with some sort of stylus input mechanism or on paper, interspersing them with text, putting other non-text documents with it, I don’t know if it’s the best approach.

      • @tal@lemmy.today
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        3 months ago

        I’d add that I’d like to see a couple changes to Markdown, and would like to see a “Markdown Advanced” that tries to be more like org-mode.

        • Markdown’s numbered lists are, IMHO, a mess. Markdown auto-renumbers numbered lists. Having an auto-numbering numbered list feature is a nice idea, but with the syntax used – where lists often accidentally wind up renumbered – it is, I think, not a good idea. I’ve seen a ton of people wind up with mangled quoted numbered lists that they didn’t want renumbered and approximately nobody using the syntax for auto-numbering. I think that it’d be neat to do auto-numbering with something like a leading dash, but not where existing numbers are present.

        As it is:

        2. foo
        3. bar
        

        becomes

        1. foo
        2. bar

        EDIT: Okay, just noticed that in lemmy’s Markdown variant, the auto-renumbering apparently doesn’t occur, while it does on Reddit.

        • I think that Markdown’s use of parens in link syntax was a mistake, because parens are valid characters in a link, and using them requires escaping the URL. I think that using angle brackets or pretty much any character that isn’t used all over in URLs to delimit the URL would have been a better idea.

        As it is:

        [The Fallout series](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fallout_%28series%29)
        

        produces

        The Fallout series

        • Markdown isn’t fully standardized. Lemmy Markdown isn’t the same as Reddit Markdown isn’t the same as pandoc Markdown. For example, in the above, list, Reddit Markdown supports embedding things like blockquotes in unnumbered list items, and Lemmy Markdown does not. kbin doesn’t even have perfectly-intercompatible syntax with Lemmy – they don’t have a common “spoiler text” syntax. You generally get something more-or-less usable as long as you don’t use some of the less-common features, but it’s really not in a form where I’d be comfortable really advocating for it for document interchange.

        “Markdown Advanced”

        What I’d like to also have is a “Markdown Advanced”. Today, I use org-mode as a marked-up text format that can do a lot of useful things (to-do lists as a first-order concept, calendar-integrated deadlines, inline spreadsheets that can update when values update, etc). Markdown can’t do that. But org-mode was developed for emacs, and while I understand that vim and probably some other editors have partial implementations, it was not standardized. I think that for org-mode, that’s probably a good thing – it lets the format be easily-extended. But it kills org-mode for document interchange – it’s only useful for stuff that you plan to keep to yourself, where you can ensure that you’re using the same program to read and write it. I’d like to see a marked-up text format that has these features and has a frozen, fully-specified, syntax, so that many programs can read and write it.

    • @fer0nOP
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      23 months ago

      It looks great, but I’m not sure if it’s a good fit for storing and searching documents. Do you think that might work?

      • @boatswain@infosec.pub
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        13 months ago

        You can have non-markdown files in your vault, but I’m not sure how readily you can search them by default; there may be plugins that support that use case though.

    • Beej Jorgensen
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      13 months ago

      Another option here is GitHub. I keep my markdown notes in a repo that I just clone from there to my various machines… And then I get to edit them in vim. 😂

  • @ulkesh@beehaw.org
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    203 months ago

    Thank goodness I haven’t used Evernote since… checks notes in Sublime Text… 2010.

  • @Luvon@beehaw.org
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    203 months ago

    Anyone remember when Evernote added a limit to how many devices can be logged into your account on the free plan? I remember. I stopped using them immediately after that. Couldn’t be logged in on my computer, iPhone, and iPad.

    Meanwhile Apple notes got much better so I just use that.

  • Plume (She/Her)
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    143 months ago

    If you’re looking for a great open source note taking app with a good free plan, and well priced paid plans, I strongly suggest Notesnook. I’ve been using it for months exclusively, it’s fantastic.

    • NaN
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      63 months ago

      Don’t they charge to export md?

    • @jawsua@lemmy.one
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      33 months ago

      Highly agreed, and I came from Standard Notes most recently. Desktop, web, mobile, syncing, and does it all well enough I bought the upgraded pro version to support the model

  • Pons_Aelius
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    3 months ago

    If you currently have more than the allotted 50 notes or one notebook, Evernote says that you’ll still be able to “view, edit, export, share, and delete existing notes and notebooks.”

    But you will not be able to create any new ones…

    But given that, right now, free users can have up to 100,000 notes and up to 250 notebooks, heavy users who have relied on the free version might immediately run into the new limits once December 4th rolls around.

    Welp, time to export your notes while you still can. My prediction is this will change within 12 months when they fail to convert free accounts into paid subs.

    EG: As of 1 july 2024 export of notes will require a paid subscription.

    • @fer0nOP
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      73 months ago

      As of 1 july 2024 export of notes will require a paid subscription

      That’s fucking ridiculous

  • @realitista
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    I’m still looking for a good self hosted alternative specifically for hosting PDF’s with full text search ability. They all either seem way too complex or way too limited with PDF (no search or preview).

    And then there’s the issue of syncing everything out of Evernote.

      • @realitista
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        33 months ago

        I’ve checked it out before and it does look like a top contender. I have 2 major outstanding questions/issues.

        First, how to migrate? I have tens of thousands of notes in many folders. Not something I’m willing to do manually.

        Second, does it allow for mixed notes of text and pdf or images of written notes?

        The barrier to entry has kept me out a bit because it looks like a big job, but would be interested to hear if someone else had pulled it off.

      • @fer0nOP
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        Does that work great for mostly pdfs? Doesn’t seem to me like it would.

        • RandoCalrandian
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          33 months ago

          Just tried it. I can drag a drop a pdf into a note, and it loads in a pdf viewer in-note.

          I can’t search the pdf text by default, but there are at least 3 community plugins with tens of thousands of downloads that are made to do this, often with OCR and works on images, not just PDF’s

          • @fer0nOP
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            13 months ago

            Great that it’s possible, but that sounds like I’d be using it for something it’s clearly not intended to be used for and that’s just a bag of pain I’d rather not dip my toes into.

        • @aesopjah
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          13 months ago

          it does now. they added pdf search stuff earlier this year. that being said, I haven’t used that feature much, so I can’t attest to it’s robustness compared to a more focused application (whatever that may be, isn’t there one that starts with Z?)

  • BitSeek
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    23 months ago

    I have been using Notion free plan. Evernote is way to limited on features and things you can do on the free account.

    • @aesopjah
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      13 months ago

      notion is good, but felt so slow. tried it out for a few months, and then did a hybrid approach with obsidian and wound up favoring and then eventually just porting everything over and fully switching to obsidian. been good.

      • Blake (he/him)
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        23 months ago

        If you’re talking about Notion’s mobile app, I believe it was rewritten last year

  • @JCPhoenix@beehaw.org
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    23 months ago

    I’ve only used Evernote sparingly over the last ~12yrs. 67 notes across 5 notebooks. Think it was one of the first apps I downloaded when I bought an iPad and iPhone. Still went ahead and exported everything, even though nothing of any serious importance. Some are just funny memories.

    I would like to find something similar, maybe even self-hosted so it’s free. I keep seeing Joplin anytime someone mentions notebook programs; time to look into that.

  • @Zak8022
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    23 months ago

    I can’t say I’m surprised. And I’m glad I got all my work stuff off there earlier this year. Guess I need to clean up whatever remaining personal notes I left behind and never look back. It’s a shame, cuz they used to be the best option out there.

  • AutoTL;DRB
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    13 months ago

    🤖 I’m a bot that provides automatic summaries for articles:

    Click here to see the summary

    Evernote is going to limit new and existing free users to a maximum of just 50 notes and one notebook starting December 4th, the company announced in a blog post on Wednesday.

    The change, which Evernote had been testing, means that free users who have a high volume of notes may have to consider paying for one of Evernote’s other plans or switching over to another note-taking platform.

    In the blog post, Evernote argues that the changes won’t affect most people.

    “When setting the new limits, we considered that the majority of our Free users fall below the threshold of fifty notes and one notebook,” the company wrote.

    “As a result, the everyday experience for most Free users will remain unchanged.” But given that, right now, free users can have up to 100,000 notes and up to 250 notebooks, heavy users who have relied on the free version might immediately run into the new limits once December 4th rolls around.

    The changes follow Evernote getting acquired by Bending Spoons in 2022 and layoffs at the company earlier this year.


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