I see it’s based on the book by Hugh Howey, who also did the Silo series which I really enjoyed the TV adaptation of. I’m wondering if it’s any good as I don’t have a lot of time for starting too many TV shows at the moment.

  • @Meuzzin@lemmy.world
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    136 months ago

    At first, I thought it wasn’t going to be very good. But then the story gets going and its kept me tuned in. I’m curious enough about the plot to keep going. Really good Sci-Fi shows are hard to come by. That being said, it’s a good 6/10 Sci-Fi show, IMO.

      • @Meuzzin@lemmy.world
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        56 months ago

        If you haven’t seen it, The Lazarus Project (BBC) is great. Well written, well acted. I thought it was going to be a variety show (I.E. X-Files, where only every 6 episodes follows the main storyline), but it’s a good continuous storyline, and keeps you on the edge…

        • @eagleeyedtiger@lemmy.nzOP
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          36 months ago

          Thanks, I hadn’t heard of it! Trailer and premise looks interesting, it’s definitely going on my list to watch.

  • @jet@hackertalks.com
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    6 months ago

    Just watched episodes 1-6 yesterday.

    Each episode is compelling, it’s good.

    Their method of storytelling is nonlinear, and some of the episodes don’t seem connected to the other episodes. There’s also a bit of unreliable narrator going on. So some of the episodes were a little frustrating to watch because they’re being so circuitous with the story

    I got whiplash with some of the character development and dialog, moving so fast, i.e. lacking character motivation and sudden emotional commitment.

    I’m on episode 6, and I’m not sure if all of the episodes are based in the same timeline, because to weave them together would be quite difficult.

    Anyway, worth watching.

    • @eagleeyedtiger@lemmy.nzOP
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      46 months ago

      Thanks. I just realised there’s only 8 episodes in the first season, so not a big commitment.

      Does it feel like there’s too many unresolved questions to be covered in the next two episodes?

      • @jet@hackertalks.com
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        6 months ago

        I’m sure they will do it. Just had some thoughts of their style of story telling. It’s fine second screen material.

        They have a huge, massive plot point, about AI murdering people… And they just kind of gloss over it no big deal. Even though it’s the first time they’re aware of this happening. HUGE fucking deal…

        Kind of like when Star Trek solved death and aging, and they never used it again

  • @ThePowerOfGeek@lemmy.world
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    86 months ago

    It’s pretty good. Not incredibly compelling IMO, but enjoyable enough. I haven’t read the books so I can speak to how it compares to those.

    Good (very small) cast, with Lena Headey and the other main actor do a good job. Dialogue fluctuates between okay and weak. It feels more of a psychological thriller than outright sci-fi (despite the setting), but that’s fine.

    The most recent episode (which provides some historical context to the story) was very contributed plot-wise and had very weak, throwaway characters. It was definitely the worst episode yet.

  • Doctor xNo
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    76 months ago

    I’m more watching it as filler between what else I’m watching,… I don’t really see a red line yet but it’s ok and interesting enough to play… 🤷‍♂️

    Just my opinion though. But it still has potential…

  • @tartan@lemmy.world
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    76 months ago

    I quit watching after episode 5 (I think). It’s visually arresting and Lena Heady is always great, but I found the story and characters a bit flat. Overall just… not worth my time.

  • @JTskulk@lemmy.world
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    66 months ago

    Can you please spoil Silo for me? I watched season 1 and lost interest, story moves too slow. What’s the deal with their technology? Why are the restrictive and nonsensical rules in place? What was the ecological disaster? Who built the silos?

    • @CountVon@sh.itjust.works
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      116 months ago

      OK, I can do that. For the record I think the books are pretty great, though I do admit they stretch the bounds of believability at times.

      Major spoilers, lore dump
      Are you sure???

      OK then, here’s the details.

      What’s the deal with their technology?

      Technology in the silos is kept deliberately primitive for a number of reasons. First, simpler tech is easier to maintain and repair. While the silo inhabitants can manufacture many things, only so many CPUs, monitors, hard drives etc. were placed inside each silo. Second, simpler tech makes the silos easier to control. I don’t remember if this is mentioned in the show, but in the books they mentions that porters carry paper notes up and down the stairs because computer messages are expensive. There’s no reason for them to be expensive, except that the powers in control of silos don’t want its inhabitants to be able to effectively coordinate and organize resistance across the levels (this is also part of why the silo has no elevator).

      The inhabitants are given enough tools and knowledge to build simple things and maintain mechanical devices, but anything involving high magnification is outlawed because if someone looks too closely out how the electronics work then they can start figuring out things they must not know. For example, all the radios in each silo were placed there when they were constructed and were tuned to communicate only within that silo. If someone breaks down a radio and figures out how it works then they might be able to retune it and pick up broadcasts from other silos. Much like the builders didn’t want inhabitants coordinating between levels, they definitely don’t want them to even be aware of the other silos, much less start coordinating with them.

      Why are the restrictive and nonsensical rules in place?

      Again, control. In order to keep the populace confined and healthy, there have to be strict rules on who can procreate, who needs to do what job, and above all that no one can simply open the doors and let death inside. Humans aren’t inclined to thrive under such conditions, which tends to lead to uprisings that have occurred multiple times in the history of each silo. The rules, the cleanings and the memory-wipe drugs are all part of an effort to keep the populace contained and safe.

      I can answer your other questions are well, but this further lore doesn't get revealed until much later in the books. Be sure you want full lore spoilers before you click.

      What was the ecological disaster?

      Self-inflicted genocidal nanobots. Read further to understand why “self-inflicted.”

      Who built the silos?

      The silo project was the brainchild of a US Senator. Through extensive political horse-trading, leverage, dirty tactics, you name it, he was able to secure funding for the silos and oversee their construction. There are 50 or 51 silos in total, outside Atlanta. The cover story of their construction was that they were to provide deep underground storage for nuclear waste. In actual fact they were long-duration isolated habitats to preserve humanity from the fallout of a nanotech war. The initial population of each silo came from a big ribbon-cutting ceremony / political rally / Democratic convention, where reps from each state were in the area around each silo. Atlanta was nuked to provide a reason to get everyone underground, at which point each silo was sealed.

      This is the other reason magnification is verbotten in the silos. If the inhabitants got really good at magnification then they might find the killer nanobots outside their door, and then there would be some very difficult questions with no good answers.

      The Senator’s thinking went like this:

      • Nanotechnology is reaching a point where someone could use it as a weapon to kill entire populations based on genetic markers.
      • Such a weapon would be almost impossible to stop.
      • It is inevitable that someone somewhere will attempt to use such a weapon to wipe out their rivals. No nuclear fallout, no lingering poisons, no destruction of infrastructure, just whole countries depopulated and free for the taking.
      • If the weapon will inevitably be constructed and cannot be stopped then we must build it and use it first, before anyone else does.

      Nanobots were actually released by the silos themselves after they were first sealed, as well as being released worldwide to kill everyone not in the silos. Whenever the silo doors are opened, additional nanobots are released to keep the area around the silo uninhabitable so that the inhabitants are strongly motivated to stay inside. There’s actually one silo not like the others, Silo 1. This silo’s inhabitants work in six-month shifts, monitoring the other silos and going into cryosleep between shifts. Silo 1 works with the heads of IT of each other silo, reading them in on part of the history so those IT heads understand the stakes. Of course, the heads of IT are not told that the inhabitants of Silo 1 deliberately caused the disaster in the first place.

      Every silo is rigged to blow so that if it looks like its inhabitants have completely escaped control, Silo 1 can remotely detonate and pancake every floor in a silo down to the bottom of its pit. Silo 1 also has bomber drones as a backup, in the event that the inhabitants find and disable the remote detonation capabilities. This is why the head of IT is so frantic to prevent an uprising. He knows that he has to maintain order at all costs, or Silo 1 can literally pull the plug on their silo and all its inhabitants.

      So why the head of IT? Because the other part of the plan is the servers in each silo. They maintain records for every silo inhabitant, and Silo 1 has backdoor access to that data. The silo project is also an attempt to prevent a repeat of a nanotech war, by reducing humanity to a homogenous and unified population. At some future date when each silo’s supplies are running out, one lucky silo gets told where to find the digging machine at the bottom of their silo. The chosen silo would be the one with the most cohesive population and the best chance of long-term survival, according to computer models and simulations. All the other silos are to be destroyed.

      • @JTskulk@lemmy.world
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        36 months ago

        Thank you so much for this, I don’t really read books so I’m enjoying reading and re-reading your comment. There’s some really cool sci-fi in here after all! I wish they could have gotten to this more quickly in the show. I didn’t need a whole “jump the shark” episode of “will the hero fix the generator before everyone dies?” when I know that’s the main character and there are more episodes in the season lol.

        spoiler

        Insane that that he would kill everyone on the planet save for a hundred thousand or two.

    • @diviledabit@lemmy.world
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      56 months ago

      The whole story and explanation stretches credulity a lot, however I would say that the pace picks up and the backstory develops significantly in the second season (if they stick to the books)

      • @jet@hackertalks.com
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        36 months ago

        I haven’t read the books, but at the ending of season 1 when they did the big reveal, I thought oh it’s going to be a fallout Vault-Tec experimentation twist

    • @eagleeyedtiger@lemmy.nzOP
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      46 months ago

      I went in blind with the show first, but I plan to read the books sometime soon, so I can’t spoil much for you.

      I didn’t find it too slow personally and enjoyed the mystery. I can see it being slow for others though.

    • @1984@lemmy.today
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      26 months ago

      Me too, I watched like 4 episodes, story was stretched like crazy and I stopped watching.

      • @JTskulk@lemmy.world
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        36 months ago

        This is the most accurate description I’ve ever heard. My mom stopped watching it with me (she’s smarter than I am clearly) and I noticed that when I would give her updates on the story I had like 2 short plot points to mention in 3 episodes.

  • KingJalopy
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    56 months ago

    I read the book just last week, had no idea it was a show now. The book was alright, it kept me entertained enough. I did think it would make for a good movie or show, but I don’t know how close to the source the show is. I’ll say that Wool and the sequels were better. The show silo was better than the books I thought, but could just be me.

    • @eagleeyedtiger@lemmy.nzOP
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      6 months ago

      Interesting that you found the Silo show better. I haven’t read the books yet but I’m going to eventually, because I want to know what’s going.

  • @RandomPancake@lemmy.world
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    46 months ago

    I’m working my way through it right now. I loved the books so I’m excited to see where this goes.

    It feels like a SyFy original, like filler. That’s not a bad thing by itself but it’s not particularly good either. I think it’s going to be something fun to pass the time and that’s about it.