Any distro I should use?

  • @KISSmyOS@lemmy.world
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    4 months ago

    Use Linux Mint until you know enough to decide for yourself which other distro fits your use case better.

    • @Penta@lemmy.world
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      174 months ago

      Mint is my favourite beginner distro, can’t really go wrong with it. What’s your main use for your PC (gaming, office, development etc.)? There are some distros that are more well suited for certain tasks.

      • @PlexSheep@feddit.de
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        84 months ago

        I’m currently daily driving LMDE after some time. For OP it probably won’t matter so choosing main line mint might be better.

        Linux Mint all the way.

    • average lemmy userOP
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      54 months ago

      fun fact: my first experience of Linux was actually in Ubuntu (in a emulator ofc), and yes Im thinking of using mint

      • lemmyvore
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        74 months ago

        Also try LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition). I think it’s their best flavor actually, but not enough people know about it and usually only try the regular Mint.

    • @rippersnapper
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      14 months ago

      Curious, why not Ubuntu? Doesn’t it have more support forums and generally more popular?

      • Possibly linux
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        4 months ago

        Almost all of those support forms are from way back when Ubuntu was user friendly and community driven. However they are no longer serving the community and shouldn’t be considered user friendly like it was previously.

        Anyway almost all of the Ubuntu specific stuff will work on Linux mint as its Ubuntu based.

  • qaz
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    184 months ago

    I recommend first switching Windows-only software to crossplatform software so you won’t have to get used to another operating system and different software at the same time.

  • SavvyWolf
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    174 months ago

    Mint is my recommendation, having using it myself for many years now.

    If you have a Nvidia GPU, a case could be made for POP! due to the built in drivers, but installing Nvidia drivers is rather painless in Mint.

  • @GustavoM@lemmy.world
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    154 months ago

    Then do it? It’s a free operating system – just download whatever distro pleases you, give it a spin, see what happens.

    • average lemmy userOP
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      44 months ago

      I would but I am pretty worried about my files being lost, plus I’m waiting until I get a better device

      • trevor
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        144 months ago

        From personal experience: if you’re trying to dual-boot with Windows, I recommend using completely separate drives (rather than separate partitions). Windows is very shitty about overwriting your Linux boot partitions when it updates. Having a separate drive isn’t fool-proof, but it helps.

        I haven’t needed Windows in >10 years though, so maybe it’s not as shitty about that, but I recommend caution.

        • @jul@feddit.de
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          14 months ago

          I’m on a single ssd dual boot setup with encryption (LUKS for Linux / Bitlocker for Windows) for over 2 years. Never had any problems.

          I used this guide back then. Hope it’ll help you op.

        • average lemmy userOP
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          14 months ago

          I would do this if I knew how to install separate drives, and if my main PC wasn’t a laptop

          • @Zetta@mander.xyz
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            44 months ago

            Maybe invest in an external drive you can copy important files to. Dual booting is usually issue free but it’s always possible to have data loss in general. Data loss, especially data that is personally important to you is a tragedy.

            • average lemmy userOP
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              24 months ago

              TELL ME ASAP, I’ll try to find the specs of my laptop, PLEASE TELL ME

              • Froyn
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                24 months ago

                Back in the late 1900s, you could open a laptop and remove a hard drive with only a #2 phillips screw driver. So I think they mean that. Physically remove your Windows drive, install a fresh drive, install/play/learn Linux. With your Windows drive disconnected, you can do ANYTHING in Linux without fear of losing any data on that other drive.

                Frustrated and just “need to work”? Reverse the process back to the Windows drive.

                Feeling a little more confident and want to access your files on the Windows drive? Get a SATA-USB adapter. No need to go all enclosure just yet as that just adds steps when you need the Windows setup.

                Comfortable in Linux? Copy your important data over to the Linux system, format the original drive, NOW put it in an enclosure for a handy backup drive.

                Feeling confident in your newfound prowess? Connect that external drive to a Raspberry Pi and turn the Pi into a basic NAS, maybe drop a little VPN on it, and now you can access that device/drive from anywhere. At the very least, you now have a place to backup important data in case the laptop falls into a volcano. Hell, now you’ve got a reason to subscribe to SelfHosted & HomeLab.

                Reference: 1998-2001 I ran a “dual boot” using removable hard drive bays on a full tower system. As noted above, Windows can sometimes mess up what makes your dual boot possible.

                Currently running Mint on an older HP Envy AMD laptop to get back into the Linux swing. Win10 is my daily driver on the desktop from that need of things to work. When you’re fixing other people’s/company’s computers all day, the last thing you want to do is work on your own computer. That and a lack of real gaming support/documentation forever ago is what pushed me back to Windows. The old argument of “Linux is free” wasn’t too heavy a talking point when MS kept giving me free licenses to stick with what I was more comfortable with. Win11 reminds me of Win8, reminds me of WinME, and the cycle of MS dysfunction continues. I want off the ride.

                With Gaming as viable as it is on Linux, plus much nicer tools for VMs (AND Docker exists now), I’ve got about year to convert my daily driver desktop (2025 end of Win10).

                Oh and I did try to put Arch on that laptop. It was overwritten by Mint as soon as it booted up without a GUI. Now, might of been my fault for using a “base image” or something, but again I need it to just work without spending what limited time I have trying to make it work. But hey, at least folks aren’t trying to get you to install Slackware from 3.5" floppies.

      • average lemmy userOP
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        24 months ago

        speaking of Linux, I was supposed to upgrade to Linux when I got my new laptop, but forgot about it, sorry!

  • @rufus@discuss.tchncs.de
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    4 months ago

    Try it with a Live USB stick. And maybe don’t listen to the people recommending Ubuntu. It’s somewhat okay, but they regularly do annoying business decisions that affect their users. I’d rather start with Mint or something.

    There are many other websites dedicated to this question:

    • average lemmy userOP
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      4 months ago

      thats sounds nice, I’ll test it with my Chromebook first (after upgrading my specs ofc)

  • @Amends1782@lemmy.ca
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    134 months ago

    For the love of god and all that is holy just use mint cinnamon it’s the easies most stable with little learning curve ever. High performance great for work gaming browsing whatever lol. If you can use windows 7/10 you can use mint cinnamon

    • average lemmy userOP
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      24 months ago

      I’ll add that to my VM list!

      LMDE Mint cinnamon plain old mint Pop OS Ubuntu

      Planning to finally boot up my VM after procrastinating, anything else?

      • @sizzling@lemmy.world
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        24 months ago

        I’ve been using Mint for quite a while now on a spare machine and it’s the first linux strain that has me not giving up in frustration. I can definitely recommend.

  • chi-chan~
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    114 months ago

    I’d go for Linux Mint/Fedora Linux.

    Another thing, I would’ve play with it first on a VM, like VirtualBox.

    I wouldn’t immediately wipe Windows if I were you. I’d do dualboot with Windows.

    Then, when you’re ready, stay with dualboot system or go full neckbeard /j

    • average lemmy userOP
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      34 months ago

      I’m actually thinking of dualboot on windows, gonna mess around to a VM!

      • lemmyvore
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        24 months ago

        You can also run many distros “live” from the install media without installing anything, to get a feel for them and to check that mosts things work (network, sound, movies etc.) You can make a bootable stick and choose the live option when it boots.

  • SterbenDeathGun
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    104 months ago

    Why don’t you try becoming comfortable with Linux while using it in a Virtual Machine? I tried different distros too, and then I decided which one was the best for me.

    We can’t really suggest you one, if we don’t know what you are going to use it for.

    You may want to do some research, because different distros have different purposes (gaming, privacy, programming, easy to use etc etc).

    Let us know, what your use cases will be?

    • Techognito
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      24 months ago

      https://distrochooser.de/ is a great tool that help to understand what the different distros can do.

      Also, you should probably know that selecting a distro is more about selecting the underlying OS and less about the UI (DE). Most distros support the top 5 Desktop Environments (DE for short). And selecting a DE can be just as important.

  • Alex
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    94 months ago

    Linux Mint and Pop!_OS are great options

  • @Guenther_Amanita@feddit.de
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    4 months ago

    Mint is the most mentioned choice and an extremely great beginner distro with an huge community.

    ZorinOS will get a big update very soon and is also a very good choice. It was my first distro, especially because it looks very modern and pleasing.

    If you’re a tiny bit more advanced and get the basics, then you might take a look at the immutable Fedora variants like Silverblue.

    They have many advantages compared to traditional distros like the two mentioned above, but atomic Linux is a relatively new concept. I also find them easier to understand and use, and, imo, they’re even more user friendly, but not as refined.

  • conrad82
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    84 months ago

    I would recommend using one of the distros backed by a big company or have very long track records. They are less likely to break on updates, and have a higher chance of supporting any uncommon hardware you may have.

    • Fedora
    • Ubuntu
    • Mint
    • Pop OS

    If you have new hardware (e.g. GPU newer than 6 months) you will probably have issues. Follow the recommendations from the hardware supplier, or use something arch based. I used Manjaro a while when I got new hardware.

    Besides those tips, you should decide which desktop environment you like best. I prefer gnome, as I enjoy to spend time in apps and not on in settings. Others prefer customization. Have a look at https://youtu.be/09cYQJBgKEs?si=KX8FZeMRcMlPTzG2

  • @throwawayish@lemmy.ml
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    4 months ago

    A couple of assumptions I will be making:

    • Your hardware is supported; consider to check driver support over at linux-hardware.org. Honestly, most hardware should be well-supported, unless it has been released very recently or is hardware from known troublemakers (i.e. Nvidia GPUs or Broadcom etc).
    • Your ‘computer-literacy’ is at least (slightly) higher than average.
    • You’ve primarily used Windows in the past.
    • You prefer asking others instead of finding it out for yourself; the existence of this post supports that. (It’s either that or you like to have a second opinion in all cases; but I would have expected more input from you if that was the case 😅.)
    • Your hardware is somewhat modern.
    • You will mostly stick to defaults (at least initially).
    • You’re aware that while hundreds of actively maintained distros exist, most of them are either niche or not worth your time in the first place. If, from the remaining ones, the less impactful derivatives are surgically removed, followed by the removal of newbie-unfriendly distros, then only 10-20 distros would remain; most of which have been named in this thread already. And your needs dictate which one out of these would suit you best.
    • You will educate yourself regarding desktop environments like GNOME, KDE Plasma, Cinnamon, Xfce etc. Perhaps you will even boot into a live environment to check them out for yourself; loading a bunch of distros on your USB through Ventoy is excellent for that. This is important as they’re arguably the biggest contributor to how you perceive your Linux system. You should also be aware that in almost all cases a second (or heck; even third, fourth etc) desktop environment can be installed on your system and you should be able to switch between them relatively easily. However, in most cases, the one provided on first installation works close to flawless while others that have been tacked on later on are generally less polished.
    • You will educate yourself (eventually) regarding universal package managers (read: AppImage, Flatpak, Nix and Snap) and Distrobox as collectively they’ve (mostly) ridden the Linux ecosystem of problems related to software not being packaged in the native repos. Don’t feel the need to indulge into all of them simultaneously from the get-go. But be aware that they exist and that they enable one to install (almost) any package that has been made available to Linux regardless of their chosen distro.

    Any distro I should use?

    Typically, distros like Arch, Debian, Fedora, Linux Mint, openSUSE, Pop!_OS and Ubuntu (or their derivatives) will be mentioned in these kinds of queries. And it becomes mostly a popularity poll that measures what the community thinks is the preferred distro for beginners. And honestly, I don’t blame them as you haven’t really given us a lot to work with. My entry to that popularity poll would be Linux Mint. If you prefer to use GNOME or KDE Plasma instead, then consider either Fedora or openSUSE Tumbleweed. Additionally, Pop!_OS should be considered if Nvidia causes problems on all the others.

    Feel free to inquire if you so desire!


    EDIT: I just noticed how you mentioned to someone that your use case will be primarily gaming. First of all, gaming is somewhat equal on most distros; especially with the likes of Bazzite-Arch and Conty providing excellent environments for gaming regardless of installed distro. Though, these containers do still rely on the hosts kernel, therefore any perceived difference on same hardware but different kernels might be attributed to said kernels. Newer kernels generally come with improved performance; at least for newer hardware*. Though, perhaps more performance could be gained through other means as well. I will spare you the details, however, as this is potentially another rabbit hole within the initial rabbit hole. Therefore, instead, I will name a couple of distros known for being excellent for gaming purposes: Bazzite, Garuda Linux, Nobara Linux, PikaOS and RegataOS. If you want a no-nonsense system, just go for Bazzite; while initial setup might seem slightly more involved, it’s by far the most robust system out of these. This does come at the cost of being ‘unique’ amongst the others, but I believe it’s a great fit for your use case.

    • @Barbarian@sh.itjust.works
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      14 months ago

      Completely agree that these kinds of threads end up being more a popularity poll than anything more actionable and usable. Everyone has their own opinions and preferences (which is great!), but that can end up being extremely overwhelming for a newbie.

    • average lemmy userOP
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      14 months ago

      sorry for being inactive here, I have other things happening at the moment. i’m just gonna put some stuff here

      You will mostly stick to defaults (at least initially).

      Kinda, I recently started to get interested in modding! It isn’t stuff like homebrew (although I was planning to root my phone, until OEM unlock was disabled. Thanks wiko.), I mostly just use something like vencord and Bloxstrap (just tweaks the Roblox client a bit, no exploits tho) This might be not seen as modding, but who cares.

      Your ‘computer-literacy’ is at least (slightly) higher than average.

      slightly, I do know how to use HTML to an extent, and can know whats the difference between RAM and hard drives, I still have a long way to go.

      Ok here are some of the specs that I can remember (I’m currently not home as of typing this)

      I have a HP 2022 Laptop, decent enough to play games

      I have a 512 hard drive and 12 GB of RAM

      only has 2 USB ports, most of it was replaced by type C, so dual booting with.something USB related might be hard

      Dabbled a bit into linux with a VM (a few years ago tho, it was Ubuntu)

      and thats all I could remember, I do plan to do an update post after trying out some distros on a VM, hopefully it works!